FEML


ECONOMIC FORUM
OF YOUNG LEADERS



11th ECONOMIC FORUM OF YOUNG LEADERS

5th - 9th of September 2016 NOWY SĄCZ
AN OPPORTUNITY TO MEET, MAKE FRIENDS AND TALK ABOUT THE FUTURE OF EUROPE

DAY 3

7th of September 2016. Venue: Nowy Sącz

9:00 – 10:15
Discussion panel:

Industry 4.0: the internet of things and intelligent assets as a key to a truly circular economy.


Moderator: Amer Benouda, France

Panellists:

  • Bernhard Budaker, Head of Business Unit Automotive Fraunhofer IPA, Germany
  • Piotr Dardziński, Undersecretary of State in Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Republic of Poland


10:00 – 13:00

Meeting of Polish-Ukrainian Youth Exchange Council


10:30 – 12:00
Discussion panel:

Scenarios for Europe – geopolitics, security, economics.


Moderator: Raul Labadze, Georgia

Panellists:

  • gen. Vincenzo Camporini, Vice President in International Affairs Institute, Former Chief of Defence General Staff (2008-2011), Italy
  • Timo Koster, Director of the Defence Policy and Capabilities in NATO, Belgium
  • Jacek Kurzępa, Member of Parliament in Sejm of Republic of Poland
  • Giacomo Stucchi, President of the Parliamentary Committee for the Intelligence and Security Services and for State Secret Control COPASIR
  • Kristian Vigenin, Member of Parliament in Parliament of Bulgaria, Minister of Foreign Affairs (2013-2014), Bulgaria


12:15 – 13:15
Discussion panel:

For freedom and solidarity.


Moderator: Paweł Nowak, Poland

Panellists:

  • Sonia Angiolin, Association Informo, Italy
  • Wojciech Kaczmarczyk, Secretary of State in Chancellery of the Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland
  • Wojciech Kolarski, Undersecretary of State, Ministry of Family, Labor and Social Policy, Poland
  • Michał Łuczewski, Dyrektor, Centrum Myśli Jana Pawła II, Poland
  • Krzysztof Michałkiewicz, Secretary of State, The Ministry of Labour, Family and Social Affairs
  • Mara Stipic Bagaric, Caritas Banja Luca, Bosnia and Herzegovina


13:15 – 14:30
Lunch

14:30 – 15:30

Special Guest of Economic Forum of Young Leaders

  • Beata Szydło, Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland


15:45 – 16:45
Discussion panel:

How to be a good leader in social life and bissines?


Moderator: Mariya Romanyshyn, Ukraine

Special guest:

  • Stanisław Karczewski,Speaker of Senate of the Republic of Poland

Panellists:

  • Zoltan Csefalvay, Representative of Hungary to OECD and UNESCO, Hungary
  • Francis Zammit Dimech, Minister of Foreign Affairs (2012-2013), Malta
  • Michał Maciej Lisiecki, President of the Board, PMPG Polskie Media S.A., Polska
  • Marco Ricceri, Eurispes - Institute of Political, Economic and Social Studies, Italy
  • Cyril Svoboda, Former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Director of Academy of Diplomacy, Czech Republic


17:00 – 17:30

Special guest of Economic Forum of Young Leaders

  • Jarosław Gowin, Minister of Science and Higher Education of the Republic of Poland
  • Mateusz Morawiecki, Ministry of Development of the Republic of Poland


17:30 – 18:45
Discussion panel:

Supporting start-ups and youth entrepreneurship in Central-Eastern Europe.


Moderator: Sebastian Kolisz, Poland

Panellists:

  • Jadwiga Emilewicz, Undersecretary of State, Ministry of Development, Poland
  • Patrycja Klarecka, President of Polish Agency for Enterprise Development
  • Kevin Monserrat, Microsoft Accelerator London
  • Artur Racicki, President Social Wifi
  • Anna Savchuk, Startup Weekend Kyiv
  • Paweł Szefernaker, Secretary of State, Chancellery of Prime Minister of Republic of Poland


20:00 – 21:00

Official Banquet at Nowy Sącz Town Hall.

The event is organised by Ryszard Nowak, Mayor of Nowy Sącz



11th ECONOMIC FORUM OF YOUNG LEADERS

"Time to begin the EU start-up - and you will be its creators"

Beata Szydło
Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland


Industry 4.0: the internet of things and intelligent assets as a key to a truly circular economy.

Discussion panel



11th ECONOMIC FORUM OF YOUNG LEADERS


Bernhard Budaker

Head of the Business Unit of Automotive Fraunhofer IPA

Is revolution a destructive and sudden phenomenon by nature? Can it only be outlived by those people able to accept and adapt to the new status quo? Those where the questions dominating the first part of the opening panel of the third day of the Economic Forum of Young Leaders.

We mostly focus on what the fourth industrial revolution brings about from an employee’s and an employer’s perspective, and how, in the current state of things, should we adapt robotics to the production process – said Bernhard Budaker, Head of the Business Unit of Automotive Fraunhofer IPA.

Piotr Dardziński, the Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Poland, noticed the influence of the contemporary revolution on the reversal of roles in the relationship between those who listen and those who give orders.

– It’s no longer the case that only politicians and leaders know what to do. Nowadays we must arrive at solutions together – said the Under-Secretary.

The fundamental discussion was happing around the educational reform.

Universities are very conservative institutions and not in a good sense of the word – said the Secretary of State, pointing towards the need for greater specialisation of higher education institutions, and for subdivision into common teaching universities and those with a non-standard education system that will educate the brightest of students.

Together with the Ministry of Education we are launching a scheme for teaching programming at all levels of education. We want pupils to be computer literate already in the first grade of primary school – stated the Under-Secretary.

Finalising the so-called core curriculum lasts approximately two years. And programming languages take half a year to alter. The teachers of programming will have to learn in the cloud and be ahead of time – he added.

According to Angelika Jarosławska, the Project Coordinator of Poland 3.0., a revolution should begin with a single individual.

We need to prepare appropriate staff for new operations in Poland. We are a generation that will watch the Polish economy change – she said.

Jarosławska talked about the Poland 3.0. project and invited new leaders to cooperate.

Poland 3.0. is a project on the scale of the Central Industrial District which it has been compared to. The concept is similar – a creation of the largest logistics center in Poland – she added.


Industry 4.0: the internet of things and intelligent assets as a key to a truly circular economy.

Discussion panel



Meeting of Polish-Ukrainian Youth Exchange Council



11th ECONOMIC FORUM OF YOUNG LEADERS


PARTICIPANTS ABOUT FORUM



Scenarios for Europe
– geopolitics, security, economics.

Discussion panel

The panel’s guests all agreed that the Ukraine conflict was a decisive factor in the way security in Europe has been perceived over the past two years. The participants also pointed to the noticeable rebuilding of NATO and strengthening its Eastern flank.

An aggressive Russia isn’t the only challenge. Terrorist organisations not only destabilise the countries they come from, but also export fright all the way Europe - said Timo Koster, Director of the Defense Policy and Capabilities at the NATO Headquarters. He also mentioned those areas of the Treaty which have been somewhat forgotten by the public, such as the Arctic and the northern Atlantic Ocean. – Those are also dimensions of our security and should not be neglected – he added.


The quality of relationships between guests and hosts requires, above all else, mutual openness to dialogue and acceptance of one another. I’m talking about this in the context of the events that have captured many Poles’ undivided attention recently – stated MP Jacek Kurzępa, alluding to Brexit and the recent events in Harlow. He stressed the need to respect the UK society’s right to self-determination. He also pointed out the importance of cooperation between Poland and the UK.

Interview with JACEK KURZĘPA

We should be thinking about a more sustainable economy, one which is immune to external blows. Perhaps we should talk about an economy that is more “green”? – proposed Kristian Vigenin, former Bulgarian Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Above all else, we should consolidate our own European economies. There are still great differences between the East and the West, North and South. We’ve been mentioning the migration of Polish workers. As Bulgarians, we face the same issue – he added.

Vigenin also pointed towards the characteristics of migratory movements: – We need to manage migration in such a way that people entering the EU will be adding to the economy and not in the way we’ve seen in the past year.

Interview with KRISTIAN VIGENINEM


The path to a more united Europe has been blocked in the past year or so, due to objections from some of the members of the EU – said Giacomo Stucchi, President of the Italian Parliamentary Committee for the Intelligence and Security Services and for State Secret Control.

When asked about security in the Middle East, Stucchi stressed that the conflict in that region isn’t just one between Shiites and Sunnis, but also a fight for domination between Turkey, Iran and Saudi Arabia, and that ISIS is simply on of the forms of directing this conflict.



For freedom and solidarity.

Discussion panel

Lack of systematic recruitment, insufficient information on volunteering opportunities available to those who are concerned and shortcomings in legal education amongst volunteers – those are just some of the issues concerning the free social assistance, as pointed out by Wojciech Kaczmarczyk, government plenipotentiary for social security. The Polish Solidarity Corps is supposed to be the answer to all those.

Our program aims to increase the citizens’ social involvement for support of volunteers and volunteering organisations - said Kaczmarczyk, adding at the same time that one of the basic areas of action of the Corps will be support towards the forgotten and neglected activists of the Solidarity movement.

Solidarity is a Polish export good. Thanks to ourselves, Solidarity is a notion that entered not only the language of politics, but also culture and history – said Wojciech Kolarski, Undersecretary of State in the Chancellery of the President of Poland, when asked about the meaning of the idea of solidarity.

Krzysztof Michałkiewicz, a Secretary of State at the Ministry of Family, Labour and Social Policy, pointed out the fact that in the past twenty five years the values promoted in Europe were ones conflicting with the idea of solidarity, such as unrestricted competition, or excessive individualism.

He also stressed that social engagement is written down under the Public Benefit and Voluntary Service Act.



On the other hand, Michał Łuczewski, the Deputy Director of Center for the Thought of John Paul II, pointed towards the roots of the ideas discussed at the panel of ideas in the Solidarity movement.

The Solidarity movement is an example that there was once a time in Poland, when the society worked against the state to change the course of the world. Those men were preoccupied by constant self-improvement. They were men of action – he said.



Sonia Angiolin i Taras Repytskyi presented the topic of volunteering from a practical perspective.

Volunteering is based on social engagement and should be there to support the society in bettering itself – said Angiolin.

Repytskyi noted that volunteering must be a purely altruistic process. It can also serve to improve one’s skills, gain new knowledge and self-growth.

Interview with: SONIA ANGIOLINI TARAS Repytskyi



Special Guest of Economic Forum of Young Leaders

Beata Szydło

Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland



Special Guest of Forum

Beata Szydło

Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland

Material Prime Minister's Office

A leader is a person able to lead a team, create a strategy and also to draw people towards themselves with their charisma and personality – said Prime Minister Beata Szydło in Nowy Sącz.

The Prime Minister argued that we can’t pretend like nothing’s happening in Europe.

The greatest crisis we face today is a crisis of value – she emphasised. She also added that a „spirit of change” can be sensed in Europe. She pointed towards a growing role of the Visegrad Group. She stated that the Group is beginning to set pace for the EU and is coming up with creative proposals.


We can’t let the European Union project be squandered – argued the Prime Minister. – We have to do all we can to breathe a new life into this project. In such a way that will cause the EU to regain the role that was assigned to it by the founding fathers and begin to serve the European nations – she added.

The Prime Minister also encouraged the listeners to not fear change. – Progress comes from change. The world is changing and so is life. But of course among all this change we need to preserve something constant, something that binds us to this place we are living in – she argued.



How to be a good leader in social life and bissines?

Discussion panel


Opinions

What leaders do modern Europe and world need?

Nonna Davitadze
Ukraine, European Youth Parliament Ukraine

Answering the question about the traits all future leaders should possess, I would like to point out the following. Leaders of tomorrow should be goal-oriented and society-oriented, they should be able to listen to other people's opinions and not only accept their own one for granted. They also should be proactive self-educators to disseminate gained knowledge with their peers and followers in further future. To sum up, cultural sensitivity and tolerance are also a must, since we are all living in a highly globalized, multicultural and diverse society.

Nonna Davitadze



How to be a good leader in social life and bissines?

Discussion panel

Opinions

What leaders do modern Europe and world need?

Bella Baghdasaryan
Armenia, R-Insights Research and Consulting

It’s always a good time to ask what kind of leadership we need because the world is constantly changing. Nowadays those changes become more drastic and tangible, as a result of the impact on humanity by actions of leaders today is to become more evident than ever before. From my perspective today’s leader should have two main characteristics. Firstly, all great leaders have to have the ability to visualize a future for their country or nation, and secondly, they should motivate others to follow them and realize their potential to become their highest and truest selves. Consequently everyone is made better off if he reaches his own potential, leadership is a positive, not zero or negative sum game.

Bella Baghdasaryan


– The notion of a “leader” is often mistakenly equated to that of a manager – said Marco Ricerri from Italy, the Secretery General of Eurispes - The Institute for Political, Social and Economic Studies. He emphasised the fact that the basis for being a leader lies in having a vision and paying attention to such areas like ethics.


– Having a vision is a cornerstone, just like trust is – said Francis Zammit Dimech, Malta’s former Minister of Foreign Affairs (2012-2013). He also pointed out that a leader must not only be trustworthy, but also inspire trust in others.


– We are currently seeing a model of leadership which is based on a “leader one click away”. Politics is competing with the media, and adjusting to their logics, which is why we have leaders who are stylish, but without content – argued Dimech.

He appealed for a recreation of the missing content of leadership and stressed that only a concept of leadership made for serving others makes any sense.

Zoltan Csefalvay, Hungary’s representative at OECD and UNESCO noticed that many of the audience were a part of the “Z” generation.


–Your careers will differ to those of your parents’, who often kept the same job for a lifetime – he pointed out. – In order to talk about leadership, we must first think about the kind of economy we will be living in in the near future. If it will be a type of a sharing economy, then the notion of a leader will change accordingly – he added.

Grzegorz Sadowski of a weekly magazine “Wprost” said that nowadays the world around us is very fast-changing which is why we often misunderstand the reality. He also noticed that it is often the case that at the time when a phenomenon is most talked about, it is already outdated.

Opinions

What leaders do modern Europe and world need?

Taras Repytskyi
Ukraine, Society Initiatives Institute

European integrity and future has become a hot topic of discussion on geopolitical arena of the world. A very important question sometimes we forget to ask is where is the role and voice of youth in this process. Events like Economic Forum of Young Leaders are helping to reduce the gap between politics and younger generation, as well as they help to empower the latter with new ideas, methods and connect them with other leaders of tomorrow. Cause only when we are together and united, we can achieve great things and make the life of our society better. Youth must be active in their communities, schools and universities. We must be active in elections, cause that's the moment when we decide upon our future. Most importantly, I think that youth must try to be a part of NGOs, as it is a very good platform for future career and life goals.

Taras Repytskyi



11th ECONOMIC FORUM OF YOUNG LEADERS


Zoltan Csefalvay

Hungary’s representative at OECD and UNESCO


Opinions

What leaders do modern Europe and world need?

Tetiana Kozlenko
Ukraine, Center for European Initatives

Leader in the modern world is a member of a group, who has the right to make the most important decisions taking into account their interests. He must have the ability to give specific answers and hear people, not just listen. Leader should be intelligent, he has to develop constantly. The highest intellectual and educational status is one of the main conditions of the authority. At the same time leader can’t forget that he is a part of the group and people are the factor that gives him energy.

Tetiana Kozlenko

Special guest of Economic Forum of Young Leaders

Minister Jarosław Gowin
Minister Mateusz Morawiecki

Discussion panel


Nations with no leaders, no elite, are nations without a future – said the Prime Minister and Minister of Science and Higher Education Jarosław Gowin, one of the guests of the special third day at the Economic Forum of Young Leaders in Nowy Sącz.

The Prime Minister also emphasized the tragic mutual experiences of the Central-Eastern European countries over the past eighty years.

A fundamental task for Poland and other countries in our region is the rebuilding of a national elite – he argued.


Together with the other special guest of the panel, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Development Mateusz Morawiecki, they tried to answer the question of who a good leader should be.

In the post-80s era there were still people around me who had no formal education at all, who were sometimes gauche, but for me, they were the true elite, they were the leaders – said Mateusz Morawiecki.

He also stressed that it’s not university degrees that decide if you belong to an elite, but the willingness to act for the common good and for the social background you are living in.


Jarosław Gowin in turn pointed out the necessary willingness of a leader to sacrifice themselves. He also talked about the issues and challenges facing higher education in Poland.

If we don’t establish universities that will offer education at a level competitive with that of decent and of excellent European universities, then the drainage will grow more prominent year on year – said Jarosław Gowin.

He also claimed that the answer to the issue lies in establishing specialized research universities that focus on collaborating with their students and getting them involved in research.



We are seeing an increase in modern occupations, such as engineering, computing and mathematics, which thankfully are fields that we, as citizens of Central-Eastern Europe, are excellent and very notable – noticed Deputy Minister Morawiecki.

We are trying to turn around the twenty six years of a particular economic model, one that led to a situation where it’s become more profitable to go away to work as a kitchen porter rather than work for a Polish entrepreneur – he added.

The past twenty seven years has been a time of catching up by trial and error, and as there have been way too many errors, I am hoping for Morawiecki’s plan to amend them – summed up Jarosław Gowin.

Interview with JAROSŁAW GOWIN


Opinions

What is important for start-ups development in your country?

Anna Savchuk
Ukraine, Luciding

The specific obstacle we used to have in Ukraine is that our government induces not innovation, but emigration. A lot of professionals leave the country to find better future abroad. Nevertheless, a lot of successful Ukrainian-born startups even if they move to the States or Western Europe continue to develop in Ukraine, because of a very good balance of price and quality. Freelance market is growing rapidly in here. I believe, if we manage to overcome step by step the political barriers, the migration tendency is going to invert.

Anna Savchuk



Supporting start-ups and youth entrepreneurship in Central-Eastern Europe.

Discussion panel




– Start-ups make me think of the time of system transformations, they make me think of year ’89 – said Jadwiga Emilewicz, Undersecretary of State at the Ministry of Development.

She pointed towards the high activity, entrepreneurship and readiness to work of people active in those kind of organisations.

Promoting these values is one of the aims of the “Start in Poland” program.




According to Paweł Szefernaker, Secretary of State in the Chancellery of the Prime Minister of Poland, in order for the Central European markets to be competitive against international markets, we need to put emphasis on promoting new technologies, innovation and successful people valued abroad.

– Towards the end of Poland’s presidency in the Visegrad Group we’d like to organise a congress of Central-Eastern Europe innovators in Warsaw – announced Szefernaker.


Artur Racicki, CEO of Social Wifi, admitted that the government plans look promising in theory, but we need to focus first and foremost on setting the market’s leaders in motion, as they are responsible for billions of zloty, and convincing them to invest in start-ups.

Kevin Monserrat mentioned the difficulties in this area. He compared the relationship between Start-ups and Corporation to that of a Man and his wife – They know they need each other, but they don’t speak the same language. He also pointed towards the need to support start-ups ecosystem from the ground up and that Microsoft has developed a programme that have the ability to support tech start-ups at all stage. Moreover, he warned that we mustn’t treat this kind of a business activity as an easy way to grow rich.




When asked whether Eastern European start-ups stand a chance of global success, Anna Savchuk answered that while it’s not easy, it is certainly possible. She also stressed that the high level of support given to start-ups by the government is an unquestionable advantage of this region. However, she added that the sheer amount of formalities that need completed in certain Eastern European countries could scare off potential investors.

Opinions

What is important for start-ups development in your country?

Asya Balasanyan
Armenia, School For Young Leaders

Nowadays in Armenia as global economies startups play a crucial role for development they became increasingly important as a business model. It started its “journey” during last decade. We already have several governmental and nongovernmental programs, but the growth isn’t tangible yet. The most important thing is that startups need isn’t only to support early-stages but also to provide mid-term support, particularly in aspects of on-going mentorship, networking with peers who will be open to share experience and challenges but as well as providing business consulting.

Asya Balasanyan

Opinions

What is important for start-ups development in your country?

Anton Holovachenko
Ukraine, European Youth Award

Firstly, it is hard to acquire primary knowledge. Secondly, universities do not provide actual knowledge, so people themselves are studying or attend to educational courses as self-education process. In Ukraine despite many difficulties and lack of possibilities we are creating a lot of innovations. It is difficult for Ukrainians to live in Ukraine, and the problem of emigration emerges as abroad, we achieve great success. Poland which has advanced ecosystem for startups has helped many Ukrainian entrepreneurs to quickly grow their business, a great example is mine situation. We have the opportunity to participate in contests, summits and to attend lectures but still the financial problem of Ukrainian support projects exists. I believe that in future Ukraine will also be able to create a positive ecosystem for startups, but now it is just the first step on the way to development.

Anton Holovachenko



11th ECONOMIC FORUM OF YOUNG LEADERS

DAY 2
AFTERNOON PROGRAM

Translation: Karolina Brzozowska

Opinions about the Forum

Ksenia Omelchenko
Ukraine,
media manager

The Forum is the real opportunity to meet leaders, opinion makers and active youth from different countries all over the world. Of course, we are talking not only about opportunity for the great partnerships for months and years. We are also talking about the common projects and ideas, inspiration and initiatives that all the participants found during this Forum. In my experience this Forum is the biggest one, and I would like to thank the organizers and volunteers, who make Poland the new youth diplomacy center where young leaders can meet, discuss current political and social situation and develop international cooperation that will change the world tomorrow.

Ksenia Omelchenko

REPORT FROM 11TH FORUM




FORUM ORGANIZERS